You Don’t Ascend the Heights by Shifting Into Neutral

A few weeks ago I was listening to a lecture by the late apologist and theologian, Cornelius Van Til, as he was talking about something way above my pay grade. But in the midst of the lecture he made a passing comment that stuck with me and got my gears turning. He said that the pursuit of neutrality is an act of rebellion against God. In other words, in any pursuit of science or academics or culture or whatever, the effort to establish an understanding or approach that does not acknowledge the rightful place of God within those pursuits is gross rebellion against Him.

This is exactly what the academics in the universities have been doing for years. The public schools have been doing it for decades. Politicians have made a art form out of professed neutrality. Scientists claim to be objective in their discoveries but reject the objective truth that holds everything together. They have ceased being scientific at all and have become the subjective, self-serving mystics of the Aztecs or tribal witch doctors all in the name of the new virtue- neutrality.

To remove oneself from under the authority and rule of the triune God is to give oneself over to the dominion of another. There are only two tables in the world in which to seek life. There is the table of the Lord and there is the table of demons. One is approached in foolishness and humility and provides wisdom and glory. The other is approached with knowledge and pride and bestows blindness and shame.

Let us remember that nothing is neutral. All of life is worship and you become like what you worship. And the desire for neutrality is not a noble effort and virtue but rather a subtle snub at the God of the universe.

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3 thoughts on “You Don’t Ascend the Heights by Shifting Into Neutral

    1. Westminster Theological Seminary has some of his lectures on ITunes U for free download. I think it was either “Christ and Human Thought 1:Greeks and Our Relation to Them” or “Christ and Human Thought 2: Greek Philosophy”. Sorry I couldn’t be more specific.

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